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Movies & TV » Has Fox Become "State Television"? » Today 7:30 am

Goose
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Let's face it, Fox's evening lineup of infotainment has been the propaganda arm of the Republican party for some time now. When you think of all of the past Candidates for the Republican Nomination who move on to host shows, things become pretty obvious.
And Sean Hannity has made no secret of his obsequience to Donald Trump. His show really has been reduced to nothing more than interviewing Trump Children, and Trump surrogates like Newt Gingrich.

Fox has always maintained that they were just an alternative to CNN. The flip side of the "mainstream media". I never bought that argument. The network is in fact profoundly different than CNN. But, Fox did have some good on air personalities such as Shephard Smith.

But, lately, the bias has completely overtaken the actual news part of Fox. Looking at the Fox website reveals an alternate universe that in no way resembles what one would see on the BBC, NBC, the AP.
Fox has even abandoned it's conservative principles in favor of defending anything this President does.
It's pure propaganda.


CNN anchor: 'Fox and Friends' is 'state TV'

CNN anchor John King blasted Fox News's morning show as "state TV" on Friday as he accused Fox's Ainsley Earhardt of throwing President Trump softball questions in a new interview. 
 
King made the comment after airing a clip of the interview from "Fox and Friends" where Trump explained his recent declaration that he had no tapes of his conversations with former FBI Director James Comey. Trump implied on Twitter weeks ago that he could have recorded Comey. 
 
As Trump answered, Earhardt added that she believed Trump's tactic was a "smart way to make sure [Comey] stayed honest in his hearings."

"Let's set aside the tough, probing questions on state TV there," King said Friday on CNN's "Inside Politics" to chuckles from the panel. 
 
"We haven't actually heard the president's entire story, have we?" he said.
 
The relationsh

Travel » Too Hot To Fly? » Today 7:18 am

Goose
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Rongone wrote:

I read about this last week.

The question that popped into my mind was: how do planes fly around the Mideast where daytime temperatures in the summer are routinely 120 and above? Does this have any effect on our military aircraft in Saudi Arabia, or Bahrain, or UAE, or Lebanon, or Qatar?

I know a lot of international flights in Jeddah arrive and depart late at night, but many Saudia flights (domestic & international) are coming and going throughout the day in those high temperatures.

Sandstorms would ground the planes, but not the temperature.

Good question. Pretty much out of my realm of expertise.
The little bit that I could find on the BBC suggests that flying at night and longer runways are strategies there.
You could also fly fewer people in order to make the planes lighter to compensate for less lift, I guess.

Travel » Too Hot To Fly? » Today 6:55 am

Rongone
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I read about this last week.

The question that popped into my mind was: how do planes fly around the Mideast where daytime temperatures in the summer are routinely 120 and above? Does this have any effect on our military aircraft in Saudi Arabia, or Bahrain, or UAE, or Lebanon, or Qatar?

I know a lot of international flights in Jeddah arrive and depart late at night, but many Saudia flights (domestic & international) are coming and going throughout the day in those high temperatures.

Sandstorms would ground the planes, but not the temperature.

Travel » Too Hot To Fly? » Today 5:41 am

Goose
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Too Hot to Fly?
Climate Change May Take
a Toll on Air Travel


Excess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and
scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.

In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift.

As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence.

“We tend to ignore the atmosphere and just think that the plane is flying through empty space, but of course, it’s not,” said Paul D. Williams, a professor in the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading in Britain who studies climate change and its effect on aviation. “Airplanes do not fly through a vacuum. The atmosphere is being modified by climate change.”

The problem in Phoenix primarily affected smaller jets operated by American’s regional partner airlines. “When you get in excess of 118 or higher, you’re not able to take off or land,” said Ross Feinstein, a spokesman for American Airlines, referring to the smaller aircraft.

Bigger jets like Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s have higher operating thresholds (126 and 127 degrees, respectively), he said. All three of those maximum temperatures are specific to the Phoenix airport; aircraft have different maximum operating temperatures depending on a variety of factors, including airport elevation.

But even though bigger planes weren’t affected, Mr. Feinstein said, American decided to give passengers on any flight to or from Phoenix between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. — the hottest part of the day

Politics » An unusual path to optimism » Yesterday 9:05 pm

tennyson
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The only joy I have is perhaps it IS TIME for the GOP to own the albatross called health care ! 

National News » I thought is was Gonna be Easy » Yesterday 5:13 pm

tennyson
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Rongone wrote:

Seriously . . . Any reasonable person with an elementary understanding of the workings of politics of the Israeli/Palestinian situation would not send a person avowed to Judaism, a friend of Netanyahu, and having a business relationship with a developer of Israeli settlements in occupied Palestine to be your primary emissary to establish a baseline for peace talks in the area.

Only an uniformed, blatantly ignorant person on the subject of occupied Palestine would consider sending an unqualified person like Jared Kushner to negotiate peace in the area.

But, that's our president . . . Donald Trump . . . "he went to Jared"

Yeah, it was NUTS !  
 

National News » I thought is was Gonna be Easy » Yesterday 4:48 pm

Rongone
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Seriously . . . Any reasonable person with an elementary understanding of the workings of politics of the Israeli/Palestinian situation would not send a person avowed to Judaism, a friend of Netanyahu, and having a business relationship with a developer of Israeli settlements in occupied Palestine to be your primary emissary to establish a baseline for peace talks in the area.

Only an uniformed, blatantly ignorant person on the subject of occupied Palestine would consider sending an unqualified person like Jared Kushner to negotiate peace in the area.

But, that's our president . . . Donald Trump . . . "he went to Jared"

National News » I thought is was Gonna be Easy » Yesterday 4:08 pm

Goose
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Palestinians disappointed after 'tense' meeting with Kushner

President Trump will reportedly receive a report about the Israeli-Palestinian peace process following a "tense" meeting between White House senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner and leaders about the issue.

The London-based Arabic daily al-Hayat reports that Kushner's meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas was “tense,” according to a translation from the Jerusalem Post, and Abbas was reportedly furious at Kushner relaying the demands of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israeli newspaper Haaretz also reports that Palestinian officials were “greatly disappointed” by their meeting with Kushner and Trump’s Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt. 

"They sounded like Netanyahu's advisers and not like fair arbiters," a senior Palestinian official told the newspaper. "They started presenting Netanyahu's issues and then we asked to hear from them clear stances regarding the core issues of the conflict."

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/339322-trump-weighing-pulling-out-of-middle-east-peace-process-reports

Politics » An unusual path to optimism » Yesterday 1:02 pm

Goose
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You know, Lager, I'm just not feeling the optimism.

Yes, I do agree with the author that the press, which has been feasting on plane crashes, and pretty much phoning it in when it comes to investigative journalism has entered a new golden age. Suddenly, everybody want to be Woodward or Bernstein.
Bravo!

But, the fact that the Paris accord was not presented to the Senate as a treaty does NOT tell me anything about the merits of the accord. It speaks to the fact that a significant portion of the senate belong to a party that has turned it's back on science.

And the fact that Obama had to work by EO speaks to the political calculus of losing the majority to a party that was hell-bent on denying Obama any legislative accomplishments under any circumstance.

As far as Congress reasserting itself. Well, Rep Nunes doesn't inspire much confidence on the doormat issue.
Also, the US seems to be edging ever closer to war in Syria without so much as a floor debate.

I'll keep my worry beads in hand for now.

Politics » An unusual path to optimism » Yesterday 12:31 pm

TheLagerLad
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In a world full of one worrisome news story, or opinion column after another, you have to look hard for something in the political universe that can provide a small bit of optimism. 

This NRO column by Jonah Goldberg fits the bill for me. I've long complained that Congress has continually ceded too much of it's power to the executive branch over the past couple of decades. Goldberg argues that under Trump, things are actually returning to the way it was intended, with Congress taking on a more equal role.

Now, I would prefer Democrats were leading the charge in the House, or at the very least, a more moderate, sensible, anti-Trump brand of republicans. But that's another story for another day. In the meantime, I'll take what I can get in terms of hope and change.

<all emphasis mine>

I do not fear much correction when I say that my columns of the last few years have not been characterized by an overabundance of cheerfulness and optimism.

For instance, about a year ago, I endorsed a Twitter personality for president. No, not that one. I backed SMOD, the “Sweet Meteor of Death,” whose sole presidential campaign promise was to deliver an extinction-level event upon impact with Earth. But SMOD, like so many politicians, disappointed me, which is why my refrain of the last few years has been, “Cheer up, for the worst is yet to come.”

I bring this up for two reasons. First, to acknowledge for the reader my misanthropic biases, and second, to beg some indulgence, as I’m unaccustomed to describing the light at the end of the tunnel as anything other than a locomotive’s headlamp. So here it goes: Maybe things are getting better.

The standard brief against the president, from the Left and much of the desiccated center, is that Donald Trump is a threat to the constitutional order. I do not dismiss this view out of hand, and if President Trump were

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